Blogger! Should You Use Blogspot or WordPress?




Blogger.com (also called Blogspot) and WordPress are the two most commonly used blogging platforms today.

Blogger.com was a pioneer in the blogging industry, allowing users to establish accounts and blog at no cost beginning in 1999.

Google purchased Blogger.com in 2003, which enabled it to grow using Google's resources. Today, Blogger.com has an undisclosed number of millions of users blogging on their system.

WordPress started in 2003 as the successor to another (now relatively unknown) blogging system.

It has become the site platform of choice for many blogging professionals.

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There are now over two million active users of WordPress.com, and there are countless others who have downloaded different versions of the WordPress code.

They're working with the Blogger setup mandates your site be hosted on their servers.

Below are some of the significant characteristics of Blogger.com versus the two versions of WordPress setups.
Blog content is preserved on Blogger.com servers.

Ability to select and customize templates (limited flexibility) Easy to get started;

simple to use Upload and store image files and picture files
Free hosting for up to 3GB worth of space
Website content is preserved on WordPress.com servers.

Ability to select and customize templates (limited flexibility) Simple to get started; Easy to use WordPress Self-Hosted Features
Website content is maintained on the user's preferred hosting company.

Virtually unlimited ability to customize and select templates and widgets

It takes some technical capacity to establish and configure.
Files support restricted only by the web server, which probably means virtually unlimited.

A quick perusal of some of the various blogs running on the Blogspot.com domain versus the ones that use one of the WordPress setups (accounts on WordPress.com and self-hosted blogs using WordPress software)

This indicates that Blogspot.com is more commonly used for people that blog about their families, pets, and other personal kinds of topics.

In comparison to WordPress users, Blogger.com users are typically not"professional" bloggers,
although there are loads of Common Joe bloggers who market their Blogspot blogs and earn a living doing so.

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Self-hosted WordPress blogs lean more toward professional entities with an IT person or department that manages their upkeep.

Since WordPress.com is similar in its performance to Blogger.com, blogs using WordPress.com are identical to Blogger blogs in articles, obviously more casual or personal than self-hosted WordPress blogs.

Cost

Blogspot accounts are free. However, if you want to do any significant customization of your WordPress.com-hosted blog,

you will have to pay to upgrade to their Custom CSS membership, which costs $14.97 each year.

WordPress.com accounts can be updated to give you extra disk space($19.97/year for 5GB up to $89.97/year for 25GB),

unlimited user accounts for your blog($29.97/year), and also the capacity to include videos (Blogger.com has this service built-in.)

To your site ($59.97/year).

Flexibility

Because WordPress is an open-source application, it gives experienced bloggers much more flexibility when customizing a website.

Compared to Blogger's platform, having advanced access to the whole system allows users to be as creative as they want to be.

This flexibility doesn't exist to nearly the scope with accounts that are hosted on WordPress.com.

One bonus that WordPress.com will provide is the ability to host documents apart from mere images.

MS PowerPoint files, Word (.doc) and Open Office (.odt) word processing files, and PDF files can be uploaded and saved for use on a WordPress.com account.

Although Blogger allows and encourages users of their setup to customize their blogs incorporating Google gadgets and changing layouts,

I've found a lot of guesswork involved when attempting to control their XML schema to customize templates outside adding gadgets and changing designs.

Several Blogger's XML tags are recorded, but that documentation is sparse.

When I assess a Blogspot site, it's as if I'm throwing my job over a wall and then checking to see what I return.
This interface can be frustrating.

A comparison that's noteworthy between each of these blog platforms is the ability to categorize posts.

Greater flexibility is present with WordPress, com-hosted sites, and self-hosted ones using the WordPress software compared to Blogger.com.

This setup doesn't allow for sub-categories on the Blogger account. Sub-categories are a natural element of both WordPress.com and self-hosted WordPress blogs.

For the layman blogger, getting started with blogging on Blogger's platform is the simplest of tasks. You create an account, pick a template, and start writing away.

The interface is too straight forward for users of Blogger. WordPress.com is similar, slightly more complicated.

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WordPress self-hosted blogs expect a user to download the software, upload it to a server, configure database settings, and execute the setup program included with the software.

This process is straightforward for someone with IT experience, but it's a little intimidating for many other people.



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